Impressions From the Öreälvsleden

Wilderness in the middle of Sweden, just an hour away from Umeå? Yes, on the beautiful Öreälvsleden trail! I just returned from Sweden and want to share some first impressions with you about this unknown pearl of a hiking trail!

The Hanging Bridge at Storforsen - Would you dare to cross it?//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Disclaimer: I was supported financially by Visit Umeå to go backpacking on the Öreälvsleden. But you know: I’m keepin’ it real and tell you how it is – I maintain full editorial control of the content published on Hiking in Finland. Read the Transparency Disclaimer for more information on affiliate links & blogger transparency.

Four days, 124 km, great infrastructure, beautiful autumn colours and a wild river in Sweden – the Öreälvsleden is a trail that rewards. While I go through the thousands of photos I took during my hike and edit the video here’s some first impressions from this beautiful trail in Västerbotten, Sweden.

Start of the trail!//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

The start of the trail for me, just a bit outside of Örträsk. Skin-out weight: Too heavy.

Instagram Stories along the way in real time!//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

If you followed me on Instagram you could see my Stories Live from the Trail =)

The Öreälv river//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

A perfect packrafting river, I made the stupid last-minute decision to not take the packraft. Next time I won’t make that mistake!

Autumn Colours!//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

The autumn colours were sublime.

Lingonberries//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

The Lingonberries were ripe, tasty and plentiful.

Tasty Dinner!//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

There was tasty food in the evenings.

Camping out!//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

The Hapi Sil was pitched.

Sunshine in the Pine Forest//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

There was sunshine here and there.

Field ripe for reaping//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Towards the south the trail became more civilized and I hiked between fields and the river.

Håknäs Sågverk//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

And passed through lovely little Swedish villages.

Tasty post-hike Dinner!//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

And I rewarded myself with a tasty Calzone and Goat-cheese Salad and Beer back in Umeå!

The full trip-report including details on logistics et al. comes next week, until then I hope you enjoyed these first impressions from the Öreälvsleden trails – and follow me on Instagram to see more of it!

from Hiking in Finland http://ift.tt/2ylMI7A

Advertisements

DMM Alpha Light Quickdraw Review

There comes a point in a climbers life where she or he no longer wants to loan a friends quick-draws. What kind of ‘draws they want often depends on their preferred style of climbing: Do they like to sports climb, climb indoors at the gym, go to the mountains or even climb ice in winter? I settled for the DMM Alpha Light QuickDraw – why you will find out in my review.

What a great route//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Disclaimer: The DMM Alpha Light Quickdraws and DMM Alpha Trad QDs have been provided by Bergfreunde for review. But as you know: I’m keepin’ it real and tell you how it is – I maintain full editorial control of the content published on Hiking in Finland. Read the Transparency Disclaimer for more information on affiliate links & blogger transparency.

Pillar of the Rain, 2nd Pitch//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Already a couple of years ago two Trad Sets of DMM Alpha Light QDs and one set of DMM Alpha Trad QDs arrived at Hiking in Finland HQ and since then have been used mountaineering in the Alps, rock and trad climbing in Greece & Norway, ice climbing in Finland and I also have clipped some gym routes with them.

DMM Alpha Light Quickdraw in winter//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js
Leading and unclipping on the way down!//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

The reason I went for the DMM Quickdraws – also the Ange Finesse QD from Petzl was being considered – was that they were for me the best all-round solution which works well in all the arts of climbing which I like to practice, and they were the lightest ones, too. The Alpha Light Quickdraws are made up of a full-size carabiner and a Dyneema sling and weigh 65 g for the 12 cm ‘draw, 68 g for the 18 cm length quickdraw and only 71 g for the 25 cm long QD. This light weight is achieved thanks to DMM’s I-beam construction, which is very durable with high breaking loads but at the same time allows to shave weight. Once you add that shaved weight up to a full set of QDs which can be anywhere between 8 and 15 draws you can easily safe some 100 g or more. This might seem like not a lot, but remember: When you’re climbing up you have to carry all the weight up, and the lighter the gear on your harness the easier the climbing is.

Three lengths//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js
DMM Alpha Light on the Botom, DMM Alpha Trad on top//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

So besides being the lightest draws available it also is important that they’re easy to use. As the Alpha Light and the Alpha Trad are full-size Quickdraws they lie very good in the hand and are easy to clip – on both ends. The large gate opening makes for easy clipping to the bolt, ice screw, cam or nut, and likewise makes clipping the rope very easy – also with gloves on in winter. The grooved pattern at the back of the draw makes them easy to handle, no matter if you’re climbing in warm Greek temperatures or at Korouoma in Finland in winter. The wire-gate construction is less likely to accidentally open and the clean nose profile again makes for easier clipping with less snagging. Finally, the deep rope basket with a 8,5 mm rope radius treats your rope well and lets it run through the draw smoothly. The final reason for me to get the DMM ‘draws was that they are Made in Wales, which I find in times of globalisation a nice thing to do.

Grooved pattern on the back//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js
Lies good in my hand//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

The Bottomline is that I have used these two different draws – and the differences are minimal, with the Alpha Light being slightly lighter and the Alpha Trad being minimally bigger – ice climbing in Finland, rock climbing in Meteora, Greece and Norway, mountaineering in the Alps and always was very happy with their performance. The different lengths in the Sets make them especially for trad climbing and mountaineering very versatile, while the light weight and normal carabiner size make them for sports climbing a very good choice. If you climb only hard sports routes you’re probably better off with a sports climbing specific ‘draw which you can easier grab by the sling, but for all-around use on rock, ice and in the mountains I can not imagine a better quick-draw. If you like to keep your climbing varied and want the lightest full-size quickdraw on the market, look no further than these fine ‘draws from DMM!

Readers from the UK can order the DMM Alpha Light QD Trad Set and the DMM Alpha Trad Trad Set from Alpinetrek.co.uk while readers from the USA find the DMM Alpha Trad Set from Backcountry.com.

German, Austrian and Swiss Readers can easily buy the QDs and some my other favourite climbing gear via the Outtra Widget underneath:

//publisher.outtra.com/themes/frontend/eom/assets/js/outtra-productwall.js?publisher_id=173&widget_id=1317

Topping out!//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

from Hiking in Finland http://ift.tt/2wpwEPS

Petzl Sirocco 2.0

The Bad News: The best helmet for climbing & mountaineering got heavier (but only 5 g). The good News: The Sirocco 2.0 is more protective, has a slimmer profile and is still the best helmet on the market.

The Petzl Sirocco 2.0//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Disclaimer: The Sirocco 2.0 has been provided by Petzl with no strings attached. Which means: I could review it, or I could just happily use it and never tell anyone about it. And as you know: I’m keepin’ it real and tell you how it is with the gear I review here – I maintain full editorial control of the content published on Hiking in Finland. Read the Transparency Disclaimer for more information on affiliate links & blogger transparency.

If you have bought your Petzl Sirocco helmet after you have read my review 3,5 years ago you now have a dilemma: The Sirocco helmet has a lifetime of 10 years including a 3-year guarantee against any material or manufacturing defects. That means if you hadn’t had a major fall or hit your head really hard against a rock or ice wall you’re good to use your orange Sirocco helmet for a while still. On the other hand, if you love your orange Sirocco but are more a Ninja-Black kind of colour person, then maybe that’s the only excuse you need to treat yourself to the Sirocco 2.0 =) Right now the Sirocco 2.0 is available in black with the orange top, but in 2018 it also will be available in white with the orange top – so if you’re more a Samurai-White kind of guy, wait a few months still!

Happy "hiking" on the Nordskottraversen//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

I received the new Sirocco helmet at OutDoor from Petzl and had it out climbing and mountaineering in Norway last week, and can tell you: It’s a beauty that is so light that you still can wear it the whole day without noticing it, just like the old Sirocco. At 170 g in Size M/L for large heads it’s still super light, but thanks to the new hybrid construction (The shell is made from EPP (expanded polypropylene) foam and on top there’s a rigid crown injected with EPS (expanded polystyrene) foam) it sits lower on your head. This results in two things: It protects the back of your head better and you look less like you’re having an egg head. Lets have a Side-By-Side look at the old and new Sirocco to see the differences:

The Siroccos - Sides//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

The new ventilation opening design is immediately apparent. I never got hot or cold with the old one, and also the new design seems to do its job just perfectly.

The Siroccos - Back//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

At the back you see that the attachment for the headlamp has changed, the elastic for attaching your headlamp now is a wee bit bigger which makes it easier to attach your headlamp to the helmet.

The Siroccos - Front//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

At the front and top you see the new design especially well, with the new ventilation openings in the front and the polycarbonate crown on top which should protect even better against rocks and ice from above, and also allows the helmet to sit lower on your head.

The Siroccos - Inside//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

The inside also has changed a wee bit, but happily Petzl kept the adjustable headband and chinstrap which I always found fantastic – they’re very easy to adjust, also with gloves on, and I can wear the Sirocco with a thick beanie or just directly, having it adjusted in seconds. Also the great magnetic buckle stayed, which makes opening and closing the helmet with one hand super easy.

Fits under a hood//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

The new construction also allows it to be much more easily be worn under a hood – and the Hood on my Houdini Aegis jacket isn’t super-large, so that’s very welcome.

The Bottomline is that I love the new Sirocco and am very pleased that Petzl updated the helmet in a meaningful way. The new Ventilation Opening did an outstanding job in Norway on the warm & humid days I had it out, and while I wasn’t able to test its protective capabilities I am very sure that the helmet won’t disappoint me when I’m out ice and rock climbing or mountaineering and doing Via Ferratas in the Alps. If the old Siroccos fitted you well and you need a new helmet – the Sirocco 2.0 is a worthy update. And if you’re in the market for a new helmet – try the Sirocco on before you buy to see if it fits. Because a helmet that doesn’t fit and hence doesn’t get worn simply isn’t smart.

Great view & a great helmet//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Readers from the UK can support the blog and buy the Sirocco 2.0 at Alpinetrek.co.uk, if you’re at home in North America please buy it at Backcountry.com or REI, and if you’re from Germany, Austria or Switzerland use the Outtra Widget underneath to find your new Sirocco Helmet from your favourite outdoor shop:

//publisher.outtra.com/themes/frontend/eom/assets/js/outtra-pricecompare.js?publisher_id=173&widget_id=7250

If you enjoyed this article why not support me with a coffee or two? I work Full-Time on Hiking in Finland to bring you inspiring trip reports, in-depth gear reviews and the latest news from the outdoors. You also could subscribe to the rarer-than-ever Newsletter and follow along on Instagram, Twitter and Youtube for more outdoorsy updates!

from Hiking in Finland http://ift.tt/2wVYAhy

Dressed for Autumn & Spring With Reima

“We’re not gonna dress her up in pink clothes” was what my wife and me agreed on when our daughter was born about two years ago. And for one and half years we re-used her big brothers clothes through all seasons. But then came spring and it became clear that we won’t be able to hold on to that idea – because our daughter loves pink and she didn’t fit the clothes we had. And so a pair of pink shoes, a pink beanie and a pink overall arrived from Reima, and we haven’t looked back since.

Walking in the forest//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Disclaimer: The Reima shoes, overall and beanie have been provided by Reima for review without requirements. And as you know: I’m keepin’ it real and tell you how it is – I maintain full editorial control of the content published on Hiking in Finland. Read the Transparency Disclaimer for more information on affiliate links & blogger transparency.

Välikausivaatteet is Finnish for In-between seasons garments and refers to garments for the very brief but vibrant spring (those two weeks where everything bursts out green plus those many weeks or months of grey & brown) and the colourful autumn. To be honest, though – the summer in Finland was for the third year in a row so wet, grey and just not summer-y that you could wear these Välikausivaatteet from May till when winter comes (thanks to climate change that likely is again January or February). Anyway, what makes these garments – and lets focus for a moment especially on the Reimatec Nauru Overall – special is that they are less warm than winter clothes but still keep especially wind and rain at bay. The Nauru Overall is very waterproof and fairly breathable, the diagonal zipper makes it easy to put on and the hood can be removed when not needed. We picked it because it is pink, but not straight-out-Barbie Pink but a nice block print with different shades of pink – something that parents that are slightly opposed to this colour still can accept. Our daughter didn’t share this colour aversion and as the Nauru Overall arrived it was the best thing ever, something that she’d pull off the wardrobe and put on as soon as just the word “outside” was spoken! She really loves this overall, and it has been very good on all her little adventures so far – be it playing on the playground, strolling through the forest and picking bilberries or sitting in the Thule Chariot when we ride around town. The suit is also spacious enough that she can wear a fleece or wool overall underneath it when it gets a bit colder, and it has a great freedom of movement that allows her to climb, slide and run. She’s been now wearing it since five months and in that time it has been several times in the laundry, but it still looks great and with some luck she still will fit it when the next in-between-season arrived in 2018.

Picking Berries//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js
Reimatec Välikausihaalari Nauru//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

As we needed some new shoes for her too, we decided to go pink all the way and ordered the Knappe Shoes. These have Velcro closures which she can open herself, and while she can not yet put the shoes on she can take them off when we come home. They have good grip on wet forest trails with roots and rocks, and also are fine to climb on boulders and at the playground. As it has been quite a bit rainy over here the shoes have kept her little feet dry and warm.

And to complete the pink outfit we got the the Linna Beanie (currently 50% off!). It’s made of Polyester, Elastane and Cotton in two layers, which means it’s too hot even for a Finnish Summer, but as I highlighted already in the beginning: There was not much of a warm summer here either way! It’s a cute little beanie that she likes to wear (beanies she doesn’t like to wear she takes off!) and it keeps her head warm and her hence in a good mood =)

Reima Kids Shoes Knappe//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js
Crawling//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

The Bottomline is that we have crossed into the segment of parents who dress their kids up in pink. It’s a rather large segment here in Finland (99% big) and as it makes her happy while keeping her warm & dry we parents will slowly but surely get used to the colour pink – and it isn’t as difficult if the garments are as stylish as these ones! And on the plus side: She’s easy to spot when she disappears in the forest to search for berries =)

If you enjoy this article why not support me with a coffee or two? I work Full-Time on Hiking in Finland to bring you inspiring trip reports, in-depth gear reviews and the latest news from the outdoors. You also could subscribe to the rarer-than-ever Newsletter and follow along on Instagram, Twitter and Youtube for more outdoorsy updates!

Looking for berries//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

from Hiking in Finland http://ift.tt/2w0w5AO

The Week in Review 270

Rain is gone/ Salt in te water/ Mountains rising

Packrafting in Norway//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

If you enjoy The Week in Review & other articles why not support me with a coffee or two? I work Full-Time on Hiking in Finland to bring you inspiring trip reports, in-depth gear reviews and the latest news from the outdoors. You also could subscribe to the rarer-than-ever Newsletter and follow along on Instagram, Twitter and Youtube for more outdoorsy updates!

News

Join the The Armchair Mountaineer Wild Writing Competition 2017.

Pinpack is a Polish maker of packrafts.

Also I found a few new Japanese Cottage Manufacturers: Mountain Gear Project makes very good looking cuben shelters and accessories, while blooperbackpacks makes packs for runners and backpackers. atelierBluebottle produces stylish accessories and packs, and mmcmgear from South Korea offers shelters and accessories.

The World’s Newest Long Trail is Cuba’s Ruta de la Revolución.

Jackie is hosting a Women’s Adventure Retreat in Ecuador – join her if you can!

Support Pretty Strong: All Your Favorite Climbing Chicks in One Film.

Good read: GPS Accuracy and the Automation Paradox.

Sweet dreams: Why do big brands crave climbers?

Enter the Bergzeit Raffle to win a complete Mammut Eiger Extreme Outfit!

The End of Walking in America.

Paulina became a Backcountry Gourmet with Adventure Dining Guide.

Listen to Enormocast 134 with Graham Zimmerman on both Sides of the Lens.

Shop and save 30-50% past seasons products with Patagonia Web Specials + free shipping over $75!

It’s the final summer sale week at Alpinetrek.co.uk – get your autumn and winter gear now!

Trip Reports

Read the First Down Syndrome Summit of the Grand Teton.

Through the Dolomites. [German]

Florence had a great time in Spain. [French]

Kathrin’s first days on the Bibbulmun Track. [German]

Beautiful views and exciting trails on the Kita-dake 北岳.

Ryan also has some great views and camps on the Ausungate Circuit.

Anna and Chris hike Hiking Grand Gulch in Utah.

Stefanie hikes up to the Große Wiesbachhorn. [German]

Bikepacking Through Czechia.

Red Bull Fox Hunt 2016.

Check out this big Guide to bike packing and touring in Africa.

Erika went more up than down. [German]

Northern Lights above Manshausen Island//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Gear Reviews

I like Iñaki’s positive thinking and imagine he was smiling here and there while writing his pre-trip gear shopping article, When plans go wrong, make new ones.

Matthias’ Bikepacking on the EuroBike article is recommended for all friends who ride bikes. [German]

Andrew the Maker’s Many Things Sack Review.

Jens reviews the Páramo Velez Jacket. [German]

Michael reviews the Haglöfs LIM Strive 50.

Drew reviews the Big Agnes Copper Spur HV UL3 Tent.

Wondering what are Sarah’s most favourite trail recipes? Wonder no more and read that post!

Raf took a First Look at the Patagonia Micro Puff Hoody.

Disclaimer: There are affiliate links in this article to help finance the website. Read the Transparency Disclaimer for more information on affiliate links & blogger transparency.

from Hiking in Finland http://ift.tt/2j9XtpL

Pier West by Bosa in New Westminster

Pier West is a landmark project that will bring vibrant design and refined living to the most significant waterfront property in Metro Vancouver. Located on 750 Quayside Drive, the groundbreaking development includes two residential towers – a 43 and a 53 storey highrise – including the tallest building on Metro Vancouver’s waterfront, plus a variety of services that add to the community.

Pier West will include a 40-space child care facility in the commercial space; two acres of park and public open space, including an extension to Westminster Pier Park, a public plaza and esplanade space; and new pedestrian connections between Westminster Pier Park, Fraser River Discovery Centre and River Market.

 

The post Pier West by Bosa in New Westminster appeared first on Vancouver New Condos.

from Buildings – Vancouver New Condos http://ift.tt/2gLk2jP

Carleton by Censorio – Burnaby Heights

Carleton by Censorio is the next new development to come to the popular Burnaby Heights neighbourhood.  With all the shops, services, easy access to downtown Vancouver, SFU and the North Shore, you can see why people choose to live in Burnaby Heights. Carleton is a small boutique building which will feature only  28 units comprised of 1 and 2 bedroom conods. These homes will range in size from 591 to 1119 square feet.

 

To be kept up to date on this development and many more like it, register with us today!

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is not an offering for sale. Such an offering can only be made after filing a disclosure statement. E.&O.E.  This information is for marketing purposes only and is subject to change.

The post Carleton by Censorio – Burnaby Heights appeared first on Vancouver New Condos.

from Buildings – Vancouver New Condos http://ift.tt/2vgNiFL